Upcoming workshop: Introduction to Protocols and Ethical Principles for Health Care Interpreters [4 hrs.]

Instructor: Judit Marin, California Certified Medical Interpreter [bio]
Date: Saturday, September 14th, 2013 Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM Fee: $75.00 per person
This course is pending ertification by the Judicial Council of California to claim CIMCE credits. Certification number CIMCE # TBA

A. Pre-session

B. Session: 1st person voice, managing flow, positioning

C. Post-session

D. Ethical Principles

1. Completeness and Accuracy

2. Impartiality

3. Confidentiality

4. Respect for individuals and their communities

5. Cultural responsiveness

6. Professionalism and integrity

Sign up now on our registration page to guarantee your seat in this course.
Enrollment is limited!

Upcoming workshop: How to Improve Interpreting Skills for Health Care Interpreters [3 hrs.]

Instructor: Judit Marin, California Certified Medical Interpreter [bio]
Date: Thursday, September 11th, 2013 Time: 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Fee: $65.00 per person
This course is pending ertification by the Judicial Council of California to claim CIMCE credits. Certification number CIMCE # TBA

1. Memory skills

2. Note taking

3. Sight translation

4. Asking for clarification

5. Cultural clarification

6. Role-Plays:

  • Diabetes
  • E.R
  • Pre-natal care
  • Psychiatry

Sign up now on our registration page to guarantee your seat in this course.
Enrollment is limited!

Upcoming workshop: Medical Terminology (English < > Spanish) [3 hrs.]

Instructor: Judit Marin, California Certified Medical Interpreter [bio]
Date: Saturday, October 26th, 2013 Time: 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM Fee: $75.00 per person
This course is pending ertification by the Judicial Council of California to claim CIMCE credits. Certification number CIMCE # TBA             

Description coming soon.
Sign up now on our registration page to guarantee your seat in this course.
Enrollment is limited!

Upcoming workshop: The Business Side of Translation and Interpreting [4 hrs.]

Instructor: Francine Kuipers, Director of The Berkeley Language Institute [bio]
Date: Saturday, October 26th, 2013 Time: 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM Fee: $55.00 per person
This course is certified by the Judicial Council of California to claim CIMCE credits. Certification number CIMCE # L2756

Our 4 hour workshop is an introduction to the business world of translators and interpreters. It covers the following topics:

  • Terminology: translator, transcriber, consecutive and simultaneous interpreter, voice talent, etc.
  • Certifications
  • How to market yourself and network
  • Trade associations
  • Employee vs ‘Outside’ Contractor
  • Continuing education
  • Cost and turnaround estimates
  • Contracts
  • Protocols
  • Code of ethics

This seminar, conducted in English, applies to anyone interested in becoming a professional translator and/or interpreter.
Sign up now on our registration page to guarantee your seat in this course.
Enrollment is limited!

The Guardian article: Between the pear and the cheese, combing the giraffe is a monkey sandwich story

Here is an interesting article by Gary Nunn for the Guardian.

It was my French flatmate who alerted me to the clunkiness of British idioms. She taught me tenir la chandelle the eloquently captured French idiom for the third wheel on a date. The image of a third person holding up a candle while two lovebirds enjoy a dimly lit dinner is perfectly rational. You can imagine Miranda Hart doing it for Carla Bruni and Nicolas Sarkozy.

The English equivalent – playing gooseberry – is frumpy and seemingly obscure. The etymology is less allegorical here: the “gooseberry” is the unwanted guest; it was once synonymous with the devil, or a bored chaperone idly picking bitter fruit while two lovers sneak off to expose a daring bit of ankle to one another in a nook of the orchard.

Guardian article

Said French roomie fell victim to my idiomatic mischief making. She was still learning metaphorical phrases when The Inbetweeners was on TV. After some drinks, I told her the outrageously crude phrase used by the randy teenage boys in the series – “frothing at the gash” – meant you were starving. I came unstuck weeks later when, in front of mutual friends waiting for dinner to be served, she remarked: “I am so ‘ungry, I am – ‘ow you say? – frothing at my gash!”

No wonder, then, that in a recent book exploring the quirky world of international idioms the French ones are the best. Idiomantics, by Philip Gooden and Peter Lewis, lists each peculiar idiom by thematic category alongside its host country. They range from bonkers to richly evocative. A fine example of the latter is avoir un coeur d’artichaut – to have the heart of an artichoke. It means to be fickle in love – as the artichoke heart has several layers.

Read the whole article by Gary Nunn on the Guardian’s website:

http://www.theguardian.com/media/mind-your-language/2013/jan/04/mind-your-language-idioms