Avoiding awkward translations

Nokia unveiled its first-ever Windows Phones at the Nokia World conference in London, the Lumia 800 and the Lumia 710. Unfortunately, Nokia learned too late that Lumia actually means “prostitute” in Spanish. Oops.

Dictionaries suggest that Nokia’s name for its latest smartphone has money-for-pleasure connotations. The Real Academia Española, considered one of the authorities of the Spanish language, claims that Nokia’s Lumia smartphone is a colloquial term for “prostitute” in Spanish.

Ufortunately, Nokia isn’t the only company embarrassed by a bad translation. There are many other product names released by companies over the years that suffered from a lack of international research.

There is where language companies like AoL play a very important role on doing the proper investigation and research as they possess all the necessary tools to avoid such situations.

Learn more. Visit http://www.thedenverchannel.com/technology/29593631/detail.html


Increase your Productivity Considerably. NCTA’S workshop on CAT tools.

Are you a translator who has never used a CAT (Computer-Assisted Translation) tool and would like to know what the fuss is all about? Or have you never used a CAT tool because you are still wondering which one to get? Perhaps you are already a regular CAT tool-user but want to learn about other CAT tools on the market, or you use the basic functions of your CAT tool but feel you are probably not getting the most out of it.

If you can relate to any of the above, this workshop is for you!

Workshops are one of the most important services that NCTA offers to its members and to the local translator and interpreter community.

NCTA’s workshops are open to members and non-members alike, but please note that pre-registration and pre-payment of workshop fee is required. Click on the workshop link below for specific information about registration fees and deadlines.


The workshop will be split into four parts. Part 1 will be a 45-minute presentation entitled “Ten good reasons for using a translation memory”. Surveys indicate that while the vast majority of translators do use a translation memory system, less than 30% of translators use this type of tool for every translation project or on a daily basis. This presentation gives an overview of the major benefits of using a translation memory, which go well beyond re-using existing translations.

Parts 2, 3 and 4 will focus on three of the market’s leading CAT tools: Trados Studio, MemoQ and Wordfast. How do they function? How do they compare? What does one do that the others do not? The presenters will spend half an hour on each tool, highlighting its features and discussing any drawbacks.

There will also be plenty of time for questions and answers throughout the afternoon.

The workshop time and location are as follows:

CAT Tools Workshop by Uwe Muegge, Tuomas Kostiainen and Yves Averous

SFSU Downtown campus
835 Market St., Room 607
San Francisco, CA 94103
Saturday November 12, 2011  1:00-4:15 pm

Uwe Muegge is the Chair of the Translation and Localization Management Program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in Monterey, California. Uwe Muegge has more than 15 years of experience in the language industry, having worked on both the vendor and buyer side of the industry.

Tuomas Kostiainen, regularly gives workshops and presentations on CAT tools, PDF tools and other topics, and writes a popular blog on Trados Studio at http://tradoshelp.wordpress.com.

Yves Avérous specializes in new technology, new media, and localization/QA for software and the Web, and also works as an editor/reviewer and voice-over talent.

Follow this link to register online for the workshop:


[Partially taken from the NCTA website at www.ncta.org].

Did you know about Berkeley Language Institute?

In our first post we mentioned a sister company of Accent on Languages: Berkeley Language Institute.

BLI offers training to become an interpreter and/or a translator.

If you are bilingual and interested in finding out  about these programs, contact Francine Kuipers at francinek@aol.com

BLI provides professional training for healthcare interpreters, bilingual staff, and other healthcare professional looking to enhance their knowledge and medical interpretation skills, as well as their cultural competency. Ethics and protocols in a Healthcare setting are part of the training. http://www.berkeleylanguageinstitute.com/assessment.html.

The training is offered on hospital premises by our coaches, who are all professional interpreters with extensive experience in medical interpreting. Our instructors have years of experience providing language services to prestigious medical institutions such as the University of California San Francisco, Stanford University, Kaiser Permanente, and also at countless private practices throughout the United States.

After an initial evaluation of the healthcare interpreters, a program is designed to meet the interpreters’ needs.  It includes: role-playing, medical terminology, pacing, protocols, memory exercises, sight translation, and cultural competency. A certificate of completion is given to interpreters who have completed the training and have met the requirements.

Learn more about BLI. Visit http://www.berkeleylanguageinstitute.com/.